Russell L. Rustici Endowed Chairs

Meet the Russell L. Rustici Endowed Chairs and learn more about their work benefiting California rangelands


Randy Dahlgren, Distinguished Professor of Soil Science and Biogeochemistry, was appointed as the Russell L. Rustici Endowed Chair in Rangeland Watershed Sciences at UC Davis in 2009. Dahlgren’s research program in biogeochemistry examines the interaction of hydrological, geochemical, and biological processes in regulating nutrient cycling in terrestrial ecosystems and surface/ground water chemistry. In collaboration with many partners, he examines the effects of natural disturbances and management activities on soil and water quality of California rangelands. For more information, visit the Dahlgren Lab web page or contact Dr. Dahlgren at rdahlgren@ucdavis.edu


Photo of Lynn Huntsinger

Lynn Huntsinger, Professor of Rangeland Ecology and Management, was appointed the Russell L. Rustici Endowed Chair in Rangeland Management at UC Berkeley in 2016. Rangeland livestock production requires negotiation between demand for a predictable flow of products and the inherent unpredictability of most rangeland ecosystems. This has given rise to a host of social and ecological adaptations to rangeland disequilibrium dynamics. Huntsinger seeks to understand these adaptations as part of socio-ecological systems, with the goal of learning how sustainable management of rangelands can be supported. Please see Dr. Huntsinger’s web page for more information.


Ken Tate, Professor and Cooperative Extension Specialist, was appointed as the Russell L. Rustici Endowed Rangeland Watershed Science Specialist in Cooperative Extension at UC Davis in 2009.  Tate’s research and outreach focuses on the diverse managed ecosystems that make up California’s grazinglands, promoting management that supports the many benefits society receives from these working landscapes, including clean water, biodiversity and agricultural productivity. In collaboration with many partners, he examines plant, water, soil, and animal response to activities such as livestock grazing, prescribed fire, and restoration. For more information, visit Dr. Tate's web page or contact him at kwtate@ucdavis.edu